Posts Tagged ‘documentary’

The Smell of Cabotage in the Morning

The offending itinerary.

Logan Airport, 4:30am “You may be alright,” Chris, the Air Canada ticket agent tells us. “But it’s risky. That’s flying too close to the sun for me.” And so begins Friday the 13th, and our trip to Japan to film SON OF SAICHI. We’ve been accused – more accurately our travel agent has been accused – of cabotage. It’s illegal. And it means we’re grounded. Google cabotage and you’ll find a Wikipedia entry that highlights our exact situation: Cabotage situations can occur as a consequence of hub-and-spoke operations. Consider that Air Canada has a major hub at Toronto that offers flights to several U.S. cities. While a passenger is able to buy a ticket from Boston to Toronto, and a separate ticket from Toronto to Seattle [in our case Minneapolis] that same day, both flights cannot be offered on the same itinerary because this would effectively be a U.S. domestic… LEARN MORE


Someday…I Will Return

Fukushima Persimmon Winter

One of the most striking things about Fukushima in the winter is a persimmon tree in the snow. The fruits have lost the wild orange color that defines them in the fall and now dangle from naked tree limbs like scarlet Christmas ornaments. Festive as they look, they shouldn’t be here now. Locals should have picked the persimmons when they were ripe, then carefully peeled, dried and painstakingly massaged them over weeks to make hoshigaki, a Japanese specialty. But there’s no locally-made hoshigaki being served on the kotatsu table this season because much of the fruit here has been found to have high levels of radiation from the meltdown of the nuclear plant at Fukushima-Daiichi caused by the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami. People tell us they are emotionally exhausted. Everything is under assault: What they eat. How they think. Where they live. The family we’re filming – the Ouchi… LEARN MORE


Reuters on THE LIST

Iraqis under threat, Indian women in focus at Tribeca by Christine Kearney NEW YORK – (Reuters) – Iraqis living in danger after working with U.S. troops and diplomats and an examination of women in modern India are two subjects grabbing the attention of critics and audiences among documentaries showing at the Tribeca Film Festival this week. Both films are part of a lineup of 32 documentaries at the New York festival, which runs through Sunday, that tell true tales from inside and outside the United States. Documentaries, which have become more stylized in recent years with inexpensive hi-tech cameras, have traditionally been a strength at Tribeca. This year is no exception, and many of these non-fiction movies will be seen in theaters and on TV throughout 2012. “The List” tells of American Kirk Johnson’s fight to save U.S.-allied Iraqis who are at risk of being kidnapped and killed by militants… LEARN MORE


Variety’s Review of THE LIST

VARIETYREVIEW_4_24_12

After seeing THE LIST’s World Premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival this weekend, Variety’s Ronnie Scheib made our day by filing this review: The Lord High Executioner in Gilbert & Sullivan’s “Mikado” gloats about his “little list” of future victims, but Kirk Johnson totes around a bigger one in “The List” — several huge binders’ worth. On it are names, credentials, commendations and profiles of Iraqis whose faithful service on behalf of various U.S. forces and agencies have exposed them and their families to terrorist reprisals. Though the pic traces Oskar Schindler-esque heroic actions by a lone American in a fight for justice, its effectiveness stems equally from the autonomy it grants its Iraqi protagonists. Strong docu should hit theaters prior to smallscreen play. While opposed in principle to the invasion of Iraq, Johnson felt his extensive knowledge of Islamic culture and fluency in Arabic compelled him to join the… LEARN MORE